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Written by: Steve Hebert for Cloud Strategy

I think it’s fair to say that the role of the CIO has to be one of the toughest jobs in the world, but also one of the most rewarding.

For starters, CIOs are responsible for ensuring that each member of an organization has the resources and tools to be productive. To do so, CIOs must also provide adequate infrastructure so their organizations can extract relevant information and analysis from computer networks in real time.

As if all of this isn’t hard enough, CIOs must constantly stay updated on the latest emerging technologies that evolve at a dizzying pace. Otherwise, they may get blindsided by the next big IT trends such as virtualization, containers, or the emergence of DevOps as a practice. Finally, CIOs must pull off this technology magic under tight constraints due to budgets and limited human resources. It’s easy to see how these CIO challenges often make or break careers, and yet they keep drawing people back to this profession.

The Shifting IT Landscape Over Time

As we all know, mobility and cloud computing have made the biggest impact on traditional IT since mainframes gave way to client-server architectures in the 1980s. However, many CIOs and datacenter managers still struggle with how to navigate the blurry edges between the enterprise and public clouds.

In this fast-changing landscape, it’s worth recalling the pioneer days of the world wide web back in the early 1990s. I remember installing and launching this strange thing called a browser from Netscape, now known as Mozilla. It was a kind of revelation — you could type in online addresses, and content would suddenly appear from far-off places.

Read the entire Cloud Strategy article here